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January 01, 2020 12:00 — December 31, 2021 12:00   ·   various

Compose Aotearoa! | National Choral Composition Competition 2020

Opportunity

Compose Aotearoa! is a new national initiative to stimulate the creation of new and diverse New Zealand music for choirs. Designed as an annual competition facilitated by Choirs Aotearoa New Zealand Trust, Compose Aotearoa! will be a rewarding pathway for young as well as established composers to produce new work.


  1. Open category – prize $2,000
  2. Composers aged 25 years and under – prize $2,000
  3. Waiata Tira with substantial Te Reo Māori content (70%-100%) – prize $2,000

An additional prize of $1,000 will be awarded to a category winner, with an invitation to join one of the national choirs as Composer in Residence to progress the work for performance.

Category winners will become SOUNZ Composers. A SOUNZ composer has a profile page on www.sounz.org.nz which lists their works, commissions, performances, films/audio, etc. and provides worldwide visibility.


Click here for Competition Requirements and to submit your entry

Deadline for submission is 5.00pm November 10, 2020 with winners announced November 30.

For any enquiries please contact Anna Bowron, anna@choirsnz.co.nz


Compose Aotearoa! is a new national initiative to stimulate the creation of new and diverse New Zealand music for choirs. Designed as an annual competition facilitated by Choirs Aotearoa New Zealand Trust, Compose Aotearoa! will be a rewarding pathway for young as well as established composers to produce new work.


  1. Open category – prize $2,000
  2. Composers aged 25 years and under – prize $2,000
  3. Waiata Tira with substantial Te Reo Māori content (70%-100%) – prize $2,000

An additional prize of $1,000 will be awarded to a category winner, with an invitation to join one of the national choirs as Composer in Residence to progress the work for performance.

Category winners will become SOUNZ Composers. A SOUNZ composer has a profile page on www.sounz.org.nz which lists their works, commissions, performances, films/audio, etc. and provides worldwide visibility.


Click here for Competition Requirements and to submit your entry

Deadline for submission is 5.00pm November 10, 2020 with winners announced November 30.

For any enquiries please contact Anna Bowron, anna@choirsnz.co.nz


August 24, 2020 12:00 — November 10, 2020 17:00

2020 SOUNZ Jazz Recordings | Call for submissions

Opportunity

SOUNZ Jazz Recording Project | Ngā Hopuranga Puoro Tautito a SOUNZ 2020

The SOUNZ Jazz Recording Project | Ngā Hopuranga Puoro Tautito a SOUNZ aims to create high-quality recordings (audio and video) of original jazz compositions by New Zealand jazz composers. The recordings will be made between 9 am and 5 pm on Tuesday 1 December, at the Massey Recording Studio, Massey University, Wellington. Following the final editing process, the recordings will be made available for streaming on the SOUNZ website and embedding on the composer’s website.

The project consists of a grant of $2,000, which is awarded to a professional jazz ensemble to perform and record in Wellington a set of 30 minutes of original jazz compositions, which have not been recorded professionally before.

Call for Proposals We welcome proposals from New Zealand jazz composers and ensembles. Proposals for the Jazz Recording Project should be emailed to info@sounz.org.nz by 5pm Monday 26 October 2020. The selected project will be announced at the beginning of November.

Given the uncertainty due to Covid-19 and the unpredictability of travel, preference may need to be given this year to composers and ensembles which are Wellington based.

Click here for more information and application guidelines.

SOUNZ Jazz Recording Project | Ngā Hopuranga Puoro Tautito a SOUNZ 2020

The SOUNZ Jazz Recording Project | Ngā Hopuranga Puoro Tautito a SOUNZ aims to create high-quality recordings (audio and video) of original jazz compositions by New Zealand jazz composers. The recordings will be made between 9 am and 5 pm on Tuesday 1 December, at the Massey Recording Studio, Massey University, Wellington. Following the final editing process, the recordings will be made available for streaming on the SOUNZ website and embedding on the composer’s website.

The project consists of a grant of $2,000, which is awarded to a professional jazz ensemble to perform and record in Wellington a set of 30 minutes of original jazz compositions, which have not been recorded professionally before.

Call for Proposals We welcome proposals from New Zealand jazz composers and ensembles. Proposals for the Jazz Recording Project should be emailed to info@sounz.org.nz by 5pm Monday 26 October 2020. The selected project will be announced at the beginning of November.

Given the uncertainty due to Covid-19 and the unpredictability of travel, preference may need to be given this year to composers and ensembles which are Wellington based.

Click here for more information and application guidelines.

October 01, 2020 09:00 — October 26, 2020 17:00

NZ Composer Sessions 2021 | APPLY NOW

Opportunity

The applications are now open for the NZ Composer Sessions | Ngā Huihuinga Hāpai i ngā Kaitito o Aotearoa 2021, closing on 22 February 2021.

The NZ Composer Sessions | Ngā Huihuinga Hāpai i ngā Kaitito o Aotearoa is a collaboration between the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, RNZ Concert and SOUNZ Centre for New Zealand Music.

The aim is to create high-quality NZ orchestral recordings and to promote the works to a range of orchestras and broadcasters.

Following the concert and the final editing process, the recordings will be available as audio on SOUNZ’s and RNZ Concert’s websites.

The 2021 recordings will take place over four days (28 Sep – 1 Oct) at the Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington.

Download more information and the application form here.

Download the NZSO Score and Parts Preparation Guidelines here.

This key SOUNZ project, delivered in partnership with the NZSO and RNZ Concert, was established in 1998 and was rebranded as NZ Composer Sessions in 2016. It produces new recordings of orchestral music for public broadcast and online streaming. 



Read more about the past recordings on SOUNZ online, where you can also find links to previous recordings and background information about composers whose works have been selected for the project.

The applications are now open for the NZ Composer Sessions | Ngā Huihuinga Hāpai i ngā Kaitito o Aotearoa 2021, closing on 22 February 2021.

The NZ Composer Sessions | Ngā Huihuinga Hāpai i ngā Kaitito o Aotearoa is a collaboration between the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, RNZ Concert and SOUNZ Centre for New Zealand Music.

The aim is to create high-quality NZ orchestral recordings and to promote the works to a range of orchestras and broadcasters.

Following the concert and the final editing process, the recordings will be available as audio on SOUNZ’s and RNZ Concert’s websites.

The 2021 recordings will take place over four days (28 Sep – 1 Oct) at the Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington.

Download more information and the application form here.

Download the NZSO Score and Parts Preparation Guidelines here.

This key SOUNZ project, delivered in partnership with the NZSO and RNZ Concert, was established in 1998 and was rebranded as NZ Composer Sessions in 2016. It produces new recordings of orchestral music for public broadcast and online streaming. 



Read more about the past recordings on SOUNZ online, where you can also find links to previous recordings and background information about composers whose works have been selected for the project.

The applications are now open for the NZ Composer Sessions | Ngā Huihuinga Hāpai i ngā Kaitito o Aotearoa 2021, closing on 22 February 2021.

The NZ Composer Sessions | Ngā Huihuinga Hāpai i ngā Kaitito o Aotearoa is a collaboration between the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, RNZ Concert and SOUNZ Centre for New Zealand Music.

The aim is to create high-quality NZ orchestral recordings and to promote the works to a range of orchestras and broadcasters.

Following the concert and the final editing process, the recordings will be available as audio on SOUNZ’s and RNZ Concert’s websites.

The 2021 recordings will take place over four days (28 Sep – 1 Oct) at the Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington.

Download more information and the application form here.

Download the NZSO Score and Parts Preparation Guidelines here.

This key SOUNZ project, delivered in partnership with the NZSO and RNZ Concert, was established in 1998 and was rebranded as NZ Composer Sessions in 2016. It produces new recordings of orchestral music for public broadcast and online streaming. 



Read more about the past recordings on SOUNZ online, where you can also find links to previous recordings and background information about composers whose works have been selected for the project.

October 19, 2020 09:00 — February 22, 2021 09:00

Yarra Valley Opera Festival 2020 presents Ross James Carey's 'Kate Kelly'

Screening

Stream begins at 7.00pm AEST (9.00pm NZST) — Tickets valid for 24 hours


The Kate Kelly Song Cycle (Kate Kelly), is a chamber opera in five scenes for three soloists, unison chorus, and a small instrumental ensemble. A creative collaboration by composer Ross James Carey and Australian writer Merrill Findlay, Kate Kelly re-interprets the life of one of Australia’s most iconic women, the youngest sister of bushranger Ned Kelly.

The chamber opera emerged from Merrill’s Kate Kelly Project. It was first performed in Forbes (central-west N.S.W.) in September 2011, as the headline act for inaugural Kalari-Lachlan River Arts Festival, beside the lagoon in which Kate Kelly’s body was found in 1898.

Kate Kelly, the sister of bushranger Ned, is a folk hero, an icon, a legend in Australia. She was born in Victoria in 1863, and, by 1880, the year Ned was captured at Glenrowan, was a household name, a teenage celebrity as famous (or infamous) as the celebrities we read about it the populist press today. People queued to meet her and to watch her ride. They bought postcards of her in her mourning outfit, a fashionable black silk riding habit.

And then she disappeared. She fled her fame, her family, her friends, the north-eastern Victorian hill country she had grown up in. She changed her name several times, and re-emerged, in the mid-1880s, on the flat inland plains of New South Wales between the towns of Forbes and Condobolin, where she found a job as a domestic servant at Cadow, a large pastoral station on the Lachlan River.

One or two years later Kate Kelly moved into Forbes and worked as a home-help for several well respected business families—but she always kept her past to herself. She made friends, went out with a couple of local lads, found one who, like her, loved horses, got pregnant, married him, had more babies, lost at least three … and then she disappeared again. She allegedly told a neighbour, Susan Hurley, that “she wanted to go away for a couple of days to get straight” and asked her to look after her four surviving children, including her newborn baby. More than a week later her body was found in the lagoon. It had been in the water for many days. The coroner concluded that she “was found drowned … but there was no evidence to show how deceased got into the water.”

There is little documentary evidence about Kate Kelly’s life and death in Forbes, yet the folklore about her remains tantalisingly rich and alive. Everyone, it seems, has a story to tell about our Kate or, if not about Kate herself, then about her husband William Foster, or Bricky, as he was also known. Bricky outlived his wife by more than forty years, and is remembered by old timers as a man who could never avoid a fight. Circumstantial evidence confirms the hearsay: that Kate endured years of violent abuse in her marriage. She almost certainly also suffered from conditions doctors would now diagnose as anxiety, depression (probably including peri-natal depression), post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Neither Kate, nor the community she lived in, would have been able to recognise or appropriately treat these illnesses, however.

This work not only honours Kate Kelly herself, but also foregrounds the challenges women of all backgrounds have faced in inland rural Australia. It also acknowledges the diverse cultures of the people who have lived along the Lachlan River for the last forty thousand years or more. The music and lyrics reference many of these peoples, including the Wiradjuri nation, the different groups of Europeans who settled in and around Forbes in the nineteenth century, and the town’s many Cantonese migrants. And, of course, Kate Kelly’s own Irish ancestors — Merrill Findlay

Stream begins at 7.00pm AEST (9.00pm NZST) — Tickets valid for 24 hours


The Kate Kelly Song Cycle (Kate Kelly), is a chamber opera in five scenes for three soloists, unison chorus, and a small instrumental ensemble. A creative collaboration by composer Ross James Carey and Australian writer Merrill Findlay, Kate Kelly re-interprets the life of one of Australia’s most iconic women, the youngest sister of bushranger Ned Kelly.

The chamber opera emerged from Merrill’s Kate Kelly Project. It was first performed in Forbes (central-west N.S.W.) in September 2011, as the headline act for inaugural Kalari-Lachlan River Arts Festival, beside the lagoon in which Kate Kelly’s body was found in 1898.

Kate Kelly, the sister of bushranger Ned, is a folk hero, an icon, a legend in Australia. She was born in Victoria in 1863, and, by 1880, the year Ned was captured at Glenrowan, was a household name, a teenage celebrity as famous (or infamous) as the celebrities we read about it the populist press today. People queued to meet her and to watch her ride. They bought postcards of her in her mourning outfit, a fashionable black silk riding habit.

And then she disappeared. She fled her fame, her family, her friends, the north-eastern Victorian hill country she had grown up in. She changed her name several times, and re-emerged, in the mid-1880s, on the flat inland plains of New South Wales between the towns of Forbes and Condobolin, where she found a job as a domestic servant at Cadow, a large pastoral station on the Lachlan River.

One or two years later Kate Kelly moved into Forbes and worked as a home-help for several well respected business families—but she always kept her past to herself. She made friends, went out with a couple of local lads, found one who, like her, loved horses, got pregnant, married him, had more babies, lost at least three … and then she disappeared again. She allegedly told a neighbour, Susan Hurley, that “she wanted to go away for a couple of days to get straight” and asked her to look after her four surviving children, including her newborn baby. More than a week later her body was found in the lagoon. It had been in the water for many days. The coroner concluded that she “was found drowned … but there was no evidence to show how deceased got into the water.”

There is little documentary evidence about Kate Kelly’s life and death in Forbes, yet the folklore about her remains tantalisingly rich and alive. Everyone, it seems, has a story to tell about our Kate or, if not about Kate herself, then about her husband William Foster, or Bricky, as he was also known. Bricky outlived his wife by more than forty years, and is remembered by old timers as a man who could never avoid a fight. Circumstantial evidence confirms the hearsay: that Kate endured years of violent abuse in her marriage. She almost certainly also suffered from conditions doctors would now diagnose as anxiety, depression (probably including peri-natal depression), post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Neither Kate, nor the community she lived in, would have been able to recognise or appropriately treat these illnesses, however.

This work not only honours Kate Kelly herself, but also foregrounds the challenges women of all backgrounds have faced in inland rural Australia. It also acknowledges the diverse cultures of the people who have lived along the Lachlan River for the last forty thousand years or more. The music and lyrics reference many of these peoples, including the Wiradjuri nation, the different groups of Europeans who settled in and around Forbes in the nineteenth century, and the town’s many Cantonese migrants. And, of course, Kate Kelly’s own Irish ancestors — Merrill Findlay

Stream begins at 7.00pm AEST (9.00pm NZST) — Tickets valid for 24 hours


The Kate Kelly Song Cycle (Kate Kelly), is a chamber opera in five scenes for three soloists, unison chorus, and a small instrumental ensemble. A creative collaboration by composer Ross James Carey and Australian writer Merrill Findlay, Kate Kelly re-interprets the life of one of Australia’s most iconic women, the youngest sister of bushranger Ned Kelly.

The chamber opera emerged from Merrill’s Kate Kelly Project. It was first performed in Forbes (central-west N.S.W.) in September 2011, as the headline act for inaugural Kalari-Lachlan River Arts Festival, beside the lagoon in which Kate Kelly’s body was found in 1898.

Kate Kelly, the sister of bushranger Ned, is a folk hero, an icon, a legend in Australia. She was born in Victoria in 1863, and, by 1880, the year Ned was captured at Glenrowan, was a household name, a teenage celebrity as famous (or infamous) as the celebrities we read about it the populist press today. People queued to meet her and to watch her ride. They bought postcards of her in her mourning outfit, a fashionable black silk riding habit.

And then she disappeared. She fled her fame, her family, her friends, the north-eastern Victorian hill country she had grown up in. She changed her name several times, and re-emerged, in the mid-1880s, on the flat inland plains of New South Wales between the towns of Forbes and Condobolin, where she found a job as a domestic servant at Cadow, a large pastoral station on the Lachlan River.

One or two years later Kate Kelly moved into Forbes and worked as a home-help for several well respected business families—but she always kept her past to herself. She made friends, went out with a couple of local lads, found one who, like her, loved horses, got pregnant, married him, had more babies, lost at least three … and then she disappeared again. She allegedly told a neighbour, Susan Hurley, that “she wanted to go away for a couple of days to get straight” and asked her to look after her four surviving children, including her newborn baby. More than a week later her body was found in the lagoon. It had been in the water for many days. The coroner concluded that she “was found drowned … but there was no evidence to show how deceased got into the water.”

There is little documentary evidence about Kate Kelly’s life and death in Forbes, yet the folklore about her remains tantalisingly rich and alive. Everyone, it seems, has a story to tell about our Kate or, if not about Kate herself, then about her husband William Foster, or Bricky, as he was also known. Bricky outlived his wife by more than forty years, and is remembered by old timers as a man who could never avoid a fight. Circumstantial evidence confirms the hearsay: that Kate endured years of violent abuse in her marriage. She almost certainly also suffered from conditions doctors would now diagnose as anxiety, depression (probably including peri-natal depression), post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Neither Kate, nor the community she lived in, would have been able to recognise or appropriately treat these illnesses, however.

This work not only honours Kate Kelly herself, but also foregrounds the challenges women of all backgrounds have faced in inland rural Australia. It also acknowledges the diverse cultures of the people who have lived along the Lachlan River for the last forty thousand years or more. The music and lyrics reference many of these peoples, including the Wiradjuri nation, the different groups of Europeans who settled in and around Forbes in the nineteenth century, and the town’s many Cantonese migrants. And, of course, Kate Kelly’s own Irish ancestors — Merrill Findlay

October 24, 2020 21:00 — October 25, 2020 21:00   ·   Gertrude Opera Yarra Valley Opera Festival 2020 (live-stream online delivery)

NZTrio | InterFusions

Concert

Presented by the Harcourts Hawkes Bay Festival
— view the whole programme
here


Amalia Hall | violin
Ashley Brown | cello
Somi Kim | piano

Beethoven | Piano Trio in C minor, op 1, no 3
Christos Hatzis | Old Photographs
Salina Fisher | Kintsugi *
Dinuk Wijeratne | Love Triangle
Ravel | Piano Trio in A minor

* NZTrio commission and world premiere


Described as a ‘national treasure’, the NZTrio have recently appointed two very accomplished new players to complete their line-up, following an international search: violinist Amalia Hall and pianist Somi Kim. This is an exciting opportunity to hear this highly-valued ensemble re-emerge in a new incarnation.

InterFusions begins with Beethoven’s powerful and foreboding C minor trio, an impressive affidavit to his masterful talents. Then we teleport far from Europe into works that are steeped in the diverse cultural backgrounds of their composers. Works by Greek-Canadian Christos Hatzis and Sri Lankan-Canadian Dinuk Wijeratne embrace a brand new work by New Zealander Salina Fisher. Her piece draws inspiration from the Japanese art of “Kintsugi”, where broken ceramic pieces are carefully reassembled, enhancing their inherent strength and beauty. We finish with Ravel’s famous Trio, bearing witness to the clear infusion of his French, Spanish, Basque and Roman Catholic influences.


Presented by the Harcourts Hawkes Bay Festival
— view the whole programme here


Amalia Hall | violin
Ashley Brown | cello
Somi Kim | piano

Beethoven | Piano Trio in C minor, op 1, no 3
Christos Hatzis | Old Photographs
Salina Fisher | Kintsugi *
Dinuk Wijeratne | Love Triangle
Ravel | Piano Trio in A minor

* NZTrio commission and world premiere


Described as a ‘national treasure’, the NZTrio have recently appointed two very accomplished new players to complete their line-up, following an international search: violinist Amalia Hall and pianist Somi Kim. This is an exciting opportunity to hear this highly-valued ensemble re-emerge in a new incarnation.

InterFusions begins with Beethoven’s powerful and foreboding C minor trio, an impressive affidavit to his masterful talents. Then we teleport far from Europe into works that are steeped in the diverse cultural backgrounds of their composers. Works by Greek-Canadian Christos Hatzis and Sri Lankan-Canadian Dinuk Wijeratne embrace a brand new work by New Zealander Salina Fisher. Her piece draws inspiration from the Japanese art of “Kintsugi”, where broken ceramic pieces are carefully reassembled, enhancing their inherent strength and beauty. We finish with Ravel’s famous Trio, bearing witness to the clear infusion of his French, Spanish, Basque and Roman Catholic influences.


Presented by the Harcourts Hawkes Bay Festival
— view the whole programme here


Amalia Hall | violin
Ashley Brown | cello
Somi Kim | piano

Beethoven | Piano Trio in C minor, op 1, no 3
Christos Hatzis | Old Photographs
Salina Fisher | Kintsugi *
Dinuk Wijeratne | Love Triangle
Ravel | Piano Trio in A minor

* NZTrio commission and world premiere


Described as a ‘national treasure’, the NZTrio have recently appointed two very accomplished new players to complete their line-up, following an international search: violinist Amalia Hall and pianist Somi Kim. This is an exciting opportunity to hear this highly-valued ensemble re-emerge in a new incarnation.

InterFusions begins with Beethoven’s powerful and foreboding C minor trio, an impressive affidavit to his masterful talents. Then we teleport far from Europe into works that are steeped in the diverse cultural backgrounds of their composers. Works by Greek-Canadian Christos Hatzis and Sri Lankan-Canadian Dinuk Wijeratne embrace a brand new work by New Zealander Salina Fisher. Her piece draws inspiration from the Japanese art of “Kintsugi”, where broken ceramic pieces are carefully reassembled, enhancing their inherent strength and beauty. We finish with Ravel’s famous Trio, bearing witness to the clear infusion of his French, Spanish, Basque and Roman Catholic influences.


October 25, 2020 17:30   ·   The Blyth Performing Arts Centre (Iona College), Havelock North

APRA Silver Scroll Awards Online

Ceremony or service

The 2020 Silver Scroll Award ceremony broadcast will be held on Wednesday 28 October at 7.30pm, on YouTube!

Amidst the ongoing uncertainty around Covid restrictions, a couple of weeks ago we had to make the decision to host this year's Silver Scrolls Awards ceremony online. The great news is that means you can all join us for the special live streamed event! We’ve been busy pulling together incredible performances and presentations which will be filmed around Aotearoa in Auckland, Wellington, and Christchurch, and think we’ve come up with a show that is a beautiful reflection of our music community, which has had such a challenging year.

On Wednesday October 28th at 7:30pm, join us in a celebration of the incredible songs and songwriters that have made 2020 a special year for Aotearoa music.

Alongside the announcement of this year's Silver Scroll winner, we will be presenting the APRA Maioha Award, SOUNZ Contemporary Award and the APRA Best Original Music in a Feature Film and in a Series Awards. And as always, we are excited to share with you a very special series of performances of each of our five Silver Scroll nominees and Award Winners.

Join us live on APRA's YouTube channel on the 28th of October thanks to NZ On Air and Te Māngai Pāho.

The 2020 Silver Scroll Award ceremony broadcast will be held on Wednesday 28 October at 7.30pm, on YouTube!

Amidst the ongoing uncertainty around Covid restrictions, a couple of weeks ago we had to make the decision to host this year's Silver Scrolls Awards ceremony online. The great news is that means you can all join us for the special live streamed event! We’ve been busy pulling together incredible performances and presentations which will be filmed around Aotearoa in Auckland, Wellington, and Christchurch, and think we’ve come up with a show that is a beautiful reflection of our music community, which has had such a challenging year.

On Wednesday October 28th at 7:30pm, join us in a celebration of the incredible songs and songwriters that have made 2020 a special year for Aotearoa music.

Alongside the announcement of this year's Silver Scroll winner, we will be presenting the APRA Maioha Award, SOUNZ Contemporary Award and the APRA Best Original Music in a Feature Film and in a Series Awards. And as always, we are excited to share with you a very special series of performances of each of our five Silver Scroll nominees and Award Winners.

Join us live on APRA's YouTube channel on the 28th of October thanks to NZ On Air and Te Māngai Pāho.

October 28, 2020 19:30   ·   The APRA YouTube channel

Olveston at Six – Spring Concerts

Concert

October 30th and 31st at 6.00pm

Olveston Historic Home opens the Drawing Room doors again to hear spectacular performances by:

Piano | Tatsuki Tomatsu
Baritone | Scott Bezett
Piano | Mark Wigglesworth
Piano | Adhinath Berry
Soprano | Rhiannon Cooper


Premiering SOUNZ composer Tom Jensen's Harbour Suite and works by Debussy, Chopin, Vaughan Williams, Schubert, Liszt, Rachmaninov, Wagner, Kreisler, Chaminade, Beach, Strauss, Poston, Brahms and Clara Schumann.

Doors open at 5.45 pm
Concert: 6.00pm–8.15 pm

Tea and coffee served during intermission in the Great Hall.


October 30th and 31st at 6.00pm

Olveston Historic Home opens the Drawing Room doors again to hear spectacular performances by:

Piano | Tatsuki Tomatsu
Baritone | Scott Bezett
Piano | Mark Wigglesworth
Piano | Adhinath Berry
Soprano | Rhiannon Cooper


Premiering SOUNZ composer Tom Jensen's Harbour Suite and works by Debussy, Chopin, Vaughan Williams, Schubert, Liszt, Rachmaninov, Wagner, Kreisler, Chaminade, Beach, Strauss, Poston, Brahms and Clara Schumann.

Doors open at 5.45 pm
Concert: 6.00pm–8.15 pm

Tea and coffee served during intermission in the Great Hall.


October 30th and 31st at 6.00pm

Olveston Historic Home opens the Drawing Room doors again to hear spectacular performances by:

Piano | Tatsuki Tomatsu
Baritone | Scott Bezett
Piano | Mark Wigglesworth
Piano | Adhinath Berry
Soprano | Rhiannon Cooper


Premiering SOUNZ composer Tom Jensen's Harbour Suite and works by Debussy, Chopin, Vaughan Williams, Schubert, Liszt, Rachmaninov, Wagner, Kreisler, Chaminade, Beach, Strauss, Poston, Brahms and Clara Schumann.

Doors open at 5.45 pm
Concert: 6.00pm–8.15 pm

Tea and coffee served during intermission in the Great Hall.


October 30, 2020 18:00 — October 31, 2020 20:00   ·   Olveston Historic House, Dunedin

Inspirare (and guests) | Te Āhuareka o Te Pūoro

Concert

Te Āhuareka o Te Pūoro | Celebration of the Music

Like most ensembles, Inspirare has been not allowed to perform due to Covid-19. This concert will be our only engagement for 2020 and it is a CELEBRATION of the choral scene found in the fantastic capital city of Wellington.

The concert will feature individual sets by Inspirare, Wellington College Chorale, Queen Margaret College Chorale, Celesta (Y7-8 choir) and Quinctus Ensemble, Wellington's newest brass ensemble.

In the second half of the concert, Inspirare will join with the two college choirs to present John Rutter's Gloria with brass, organ, and percussion. The evening will close with David Hamilton's setting of Dona Nobis Pacem, written for double choir, children's chorus, 4-hand piano and percussion. David will be present with us for this concert, which is a very special treat!

Buy your tickets today and don't miss out on the only concert in 2020 for Inspirare!

Te Āhuareka o Te Pūoro | Celebration of the Music

Like most ensembles, Inspirare has been not allowed to perform due to Covid-19. This concert will be our only engagement for 2020 and it is a CELEBRATION of the choral scene found in the fantastic capital city of Wellington.

The concert will feature individual sets by Inspirare, Wellington College Chorale, Queen Margaret College Chorale, Celesta (Y7-8 choir) and Quinctus Ensemble, Wellington's newest brass ensemble.

In the second half of the concert, Inspirare will join with the two college choirs to present John Rutter's Gloria with brass, organ, and percussion. The evening will close with David Hamilton's setting of Dona Nobis Pacem, written for double choir, children's chorus, 4-hand piano and percussion. David will be present with us for this concert, which is a very special treat!

Buy your tickets today and don't miss out on the only concert in 2020 for Inspirare!

Te Āhuareka o Te Pūoro | Celebration of the Music

Like most ensembles, Inspirare has been not allowed to perform due to Covid-19. This concert will be our only engagement for 2020 and it is a CELEBRATION of the choral scene found in the fantastic capital city of Wellington.

The concert will feature individual sets by Inspirare, Wellington College Chorale, Queen Margaret College Chorale, Celesta (Y7-8 choir) and Quinctus Ensemble, Wellington's newest brass ensemble.

In the second half of the concert, Inspirare will join with the two college choirs to present John Rutter's Gloria with brass, organ, and percussion. The evening will close with David Hamilton's setting of Dona Nobis Pacem, written for double choir, children's chorus, 4-hand piano and percussion. David will be present with us for this concert, which is a very special treat!

Buy your tickets today and don't miss out on the only concert in 2020 for Inspirare!

October 31, 2020 19:30 — October 31, 2020 21:30   ·   The Wellington City Corps

Aroha string Quartet | Phantasy (with Robert Orr, oboe)

Concert

Britten | Phantasy Quartet for Oboe & String Trio Op 2
Beethoven | String Quartet No 7 in F Op 59 No 1 'Rasumovsky'
Alex Taylor | refrain
Bliss | Quintet for Oboe & String Quartet


In a colourful and energy-filled programme, the Aroha Quartet is joined by Robert Orr, NZSO Principal Oboe, for two British works for oboe and strings: Britten's Phantasy Quartet Op 2, the first piece that brought him international recognition, and Bliss's gorgeous Oboe Quintet. The programme also celebrates the 250th anniversary of Beethoven's birth with his first 'Rasumovsky' quartet, the String Quartet No 7 in F, Op 59 No 1. The fourth work in this programme is refrain, by award-winning New Zealand composer Alex Taylor.


Britten | Phantasy Quartet for Oboe & String Trio Op 2
Beethoven | String Quartet No 7 in F Op 59 No 1 'Rasumovsky'
Alex Taylor | refrain
Bliss | Quintet for Oboe & String Quartet


In a colourful and energy-filled programme, the Aroha Quartet is joined by Robert Orr, NZSO Principal Oboe, for two British works for oboe and strings: Britten's Phantasy Quartet Op 2, the first piece that brought him international recognition, and Bliss's gorgeous Oboe Quintet. The programme also celebrates the 250th anniversary of Beethoven's birth with his first 'Rasumovsky' quartet, the String Quartet No 7 in F, Op 59 No 1. The fourth work in this programme is refrain, by award-winning New Zealand composer Alex Taylor.


Britten | Phantasy Quartet for Oboe & String Trio Op 2
Beethoven | String Quartet No 7 in F Op 59 No 1 'Rasumovsky'
Alex Taylor | refrain
Bliss | Quintet for Oboe & String Quartet


In a colourful and energy-filled programme, the Aroha Quartet is joined by Robert Orr, NZSO Principal Oboe, for two British works for oboe and strings: Britten's Phantasy Quartet Op 2, the first piece that brought him international recognition, and Bliss's gorgeous Oboe Quintet. The programme also celebrates the 250th anniversary of Beethoven's birth with his first 'Rasumovsky' quartet, the String Quartet No 7 in F, Op 59 No 1. The fourth work in this programme is refrain, by award-winning New Zealand composer Alex Taylor.


November 01, 2020 15:00   ·   St Andrew's on the Terrace, Wellington

Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra | Poetry & Passion

Concert

Giordano Bellincampi | Conductor
Ingrid Fliter | Piano

Leonie Holmes | New work
Schumann | Piano Concerto
Tchaikovsky | Symphony No.4


Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony opens with a stark fanfare which, Tchaikovsky said, represented ‘Fate, that ominous power’, adding ‘There is no alternative but to submit to Fate’. His friend and patron, Mme von Meck, heard ‘profound, terrifying despair’ in this music. True, but it has also passion, drama and ultimately catharsis.

The superb pianist Ingrid Fliter returns with Schumann’s ineffably poetic concerto, and to open the concert, a new work from the multifaceted Auckland composer, and former APO composer-in-residence, Leonie Holmes.


Giordano Bellincampi | Conductor
Ingrid Fliter | Piano

Leonie Holmes | New work
Schumann | Piano Concerto
Tchaikovsky | Symphony No.4


Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony opens with a stark fanfare which, Tchaikovsky said, represented ‘Fate, that ominous power’, adding ‘There is no alternative but to submit to Fate’. His friend and patron, Mme von Meck, heard ‘profound, terrifying despair’ in this music. True, but it has also passion, drama and ultimately catharsis.

The superb pianist Ingrid Fliter returns with Schumann’s ineffably poetic concerto, and to open the concert, a new work from the multifaceted Auckland composer, and former APO composer-in-residence, Leonie Holmes.


Giordano Bellincampi | Conductor
Ingrid Fliter | Piano

Leonie Holmes | New work
Schumann | Piano Concerto
Tchaikovsky | Symphony No.4


Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony opens with a stark fanfare which, Tchaikovsky said, represented ‘Fate, that ominous power’, adding ‘There is no alternative but to submit to Fate’. His friend and patron, Mme von Meck, heard ‘profound, terrifying despair’ in this music. True, but it has also passion, drama and ultimately catharsis.

The superb pianist Ingrid Fliter returns with Schumann’s ineffably poetic concerto, and to open the concert, a new work from the multifaceted Auckland composer, and former APO composer-in-residence, Leonie Holmes.


November 12, 2020 20:00   ·   Auckland Town Hall

NZSO Shed Series | Kabarett

Concert

Hamish McKeich | conductor

Eisler | Kleine Sinfonie
Simon Eastwood | Quanta
Weill (arr. Bruckner-Ruggerberg) | Suite from Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny
Satie (arr. Debussy) | Gymnopédies Nos. 1 & 3
Schreker | Kammersymphonie


The final Shed Series concert of 2020 celebrates some of the weird and wonderful music linked to the flourishing cabaret scene of the 1920s and 30s and which continues to inspire composers and delight audiences today.

Austrian composer Hanns Eisler also worked with Weill, and the concert features his sweeping and engrossing Kleine Sinfonie before New Zealand composer Simon Eastwood’s Quanta.

Kurt Weill is best known for his cabaret-era songs with librettist Bertolt Brecht. His Suite from Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny (Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny) is a stunning arrangement by Wilhelm Brückner-Rüggeberg. Rarely performed in New Zealand, it features banjo, bass guitar, saxophone and more, alongside orchestral instruments, to capture the essence of Weill and Brecht’s hit 1930 opera.

Shed Series 2020 concludes with Claude Debussy’s orchestral arrangement of fellow Frenchman Eric Satie’s timeless and hugely influential Gymnopédies Nos. 1 & 3 and Austrian Franz Schreker‘s Kammersymphonie. Written in 1916 Kammersymphonie was ahead of its time and remains a heartfelt and emotive work, anticipating orchestral music’s wide use in film.

Hamish McKeich | conductor

Eisler | Kleine Sinfonie
Simon Eastwood | Quanta
Weill (arr. Bruckner-Ruggerberg) | Suite from Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny
Satie (arr. Debussy) | Gymnopédies Nos. 1 & 3
Schreker | Kammersymphonie


The final Shed Series concert of 2020 celebrates some of the weird and wonderful music linked to the flourishing cabaret scene of the 1920s and 30s and which continues to inspire composers and delight audiences today.

Austrian composer Hanns Eisler also worked with Weill, and the concert features his sweeping and engrossing Kleine Sinfonie before New Zealand composer Simon Eastwood’s Quanta.

Kurt Weill is best known for his cabaret-era songs with librettist Bertolt Brecht. His Suite from Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny (Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny) is a stunning arrangement by Wilhelm Brückner-Rüggeberg. Rarely performed in New Zealand, it features banjo, bass guitar, saxophone and more, alongside orchestral instruments, to capture the essence of Weill and Brecht’s hit 1930 opera.

Shed Series 2020 concludes with Claude Debussy’s orchestral arrangement of fellow Frenchman Eric Satie’s timeless and hugely influential Gymnopédies Nos. 1 & 3 and Austrian Franz Schreker‘s Kammersymphonie. Written in 1916 Kammersymphonie was ahead of its time and remains a heartfelt and emotive work, anticipating orchestral music’s wide use in film.

Hamish McKeich | conductor

Eisler | Kleine Sinfonie
Simon Eastwood | Quanta
Weill (arr. Bruckner-Ruggerberg) | Suite from Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny
Satie (arr. Debussy) | Gymnopédies Nos. 1 & 3
Schreker | Kammersymphonie


The final Shed Series concert of 2020 celebrates some of the weird and wonderful music linked to the flourishing cabaret scene of the 1920s and 30s and which continues to inspire composers and delight audiences today.

Austrian composer Hanns Eisler also worked with Weill, and the concert features his sweeping and engrossing Kleine Sinfonie before New Zealand composer Simon Eastwood’s Quanta.

Kurt Weill is best known for his cabaret-era songs with librettist Bertolt Brecht. His Suite from Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny (Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny) is a stunning arrangement by Wilhelm Brückner-Rüggeberg. Rarely performed in New Zealand, it features banjo, bass guitar, saxophone and more, alongside orchestral instruments, to capture the essence of Weill and Brecht’s hit 1930 opera.

Shed Series 2020 concludes with Claude Debussy’s orchestral arrangement of fellow Frenchman Eric Satie’s timeless and hugely influential Gymnopédies Nos. 1 & 3 and Austrian Franz Schreker‘s Kammersymphonie. Written in 1916 Kammersymphonie was ahead of its time and remains a heartfelt and emotive work, anticipating orchestral music’s wide use in film.

November 13, 2020 19:30   ·   Shed 6, Wellington

Manukau Symphony Orchestra | Seascapes

Concert

Uwe Grodd | Conductor
Andrew Joyce | Cello
Gina Sanders | Soprano
Auckland Choral

Bliss | Concerto for Cello and Orchestra
Beethoven | Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage
Brahms | Schicksalslied 'Song of Destiny'
Chris Artley | Of Land and Sea (new MSO commission)


Sir Arthur Bliss wrote of his Cello Concerto, ‘I sketched out the music in the spring of 1969, and, on his acceptance, I dedicated it “to Mstislav Rostropovich with admiration and gratitude”. It is a light-hearted work and there are no problems for the listener – only for the soloist!’

We are thrilled to welcome back Andrew Joyce, Principal Cellist of the NZSO, as soloist for the first performance of this colourful English concerto in Manukau.

Then it is Auckland Choral’s turn to join the MSO for Beethoven’s Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage – based on two poems by Goethe, and Brahms’ major choral work Schicksalslied – Song of Destiny. It has been said that ‘had Brahms never written anything but this one work, it would alone have sufficed to rank him with the best masters’.

Our final music offering for the year is Chris Artley’s Of Land and Sea – a major new work by this Auckland composer, renowned for his sumptuous choral writing. Scored for Soprano Solo, 4-part Choir and a full Symphony Orchestra, and commissioned by the Manukau Orchestral Society, the MSO is proud to present the premiere performance of this inspirational work based on poems by Aucklander Robina Adamson.


View the press release here


Uwe Grodd | Conductor
Andrew Joyce | Cello
Gina Sanders | Soprano
Auckland Choral

Bliss | Concerto for Cello and Orchestra
Beethoven | Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage
Brahms | Schicksalslied 'Song of Destiny'
Chris Artley | Of Land and Sea (new MSO commission)


Sir Arthur Bliss wrote of his Cello Concerto, ‘I sketched out the music in the spring of 1969, and, on his acceptance, I dedicated it “to Mstislav Rostropovich with admiration and gratitude”. It is a light-hearted work and there are no problems for the listener – only for the soloist!’

We are thrilled to welcome back Andrew Joyce, Principal Cellist of the NZSO, as soloist for the first performance of this colourful English concerto in Manukau.

Then it is Auckland Choral’s turn to join the MSO for Beethoven’s Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage – based on two poems by Goethe, and Brahms’ major choral work Schicksalslied – Song of Destiny. It has been said that ‘had Brahms never written anything but this one work, it would alone have sufficed to rank him with the best masters’.

Our final music offering for the year is Chris Artley’s Of Land and Sea – a major new work by this Auckland composer, renowned for his sumptuous choral writing. Scored for Soprano Solo, 4-part Choir and a full Symphony Orchestra, and commissioned by the Manukau Orchestral Society, the MSO is proud to present the premiere performance of this inspirational work based on poems by Aucklander Robina Adamson.


View the press release here


Uwe Grodd | Conductor
Andrew Joyce | Cello
Gina Sanders | Soprano
Auckland Choral

Bliss | Concerto for Cello and Orchestra
Beethoven | Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage
Brahms | Schicksalslied 'Song of Destiny'
Chris Artley | Of Land and Sea (new MSO commission)


Sir Arthur Bliss wrote of his Cello Concerto, ‘I sketched out the music in the spring of 1969, and, on his acceptance, I dedicated it “to Mstislav Rostropovich with admiration and gratitude”. It is a light-hearted work and there are no problems for the listener – only for the soloist!’

We are thrilled to welcome back Andrew Joyce, Principal Cellist of the NZSO, as soloist for the first performance of this colourful English concerto in Manukau.

Then it is Auckland Choral’s turn to join the MSO for Beethoven’s Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage – based on two poems by Goethe, and Brahms’ major choral work Schicksalslied – Song of Destiny. It has been said that ‘had Brahms never written anything but this one work, it would alone have sufficed to rank him with the best masters’.

Our final music offering for the year is Chris Artley’s Of Land and Sea – a major new work by this Auckland composer, renowned for his sumptuous choral writing. Scored for Soprano Solo, 4-part Choir and a full Symphony Orchestra, and commissioned by the Manukau Orchestral Society, the MSO is proud to present the premiere performance of this inspirational work based on poems by Aucklander Robina Adamson.


View the press release here


November 14, 2020 19:30 — November 14, 2020 21:30   ·   Vodafone Events Centre, Manukau

Telling Tales: Contemporary Works for Solo Recorder

Concert

Icarus finding his wings (and his hubris!), the horns of Tennyson’s Elfland echoing through the valley, the mythical breath of the lion-headed goddess Sakhmet… these stories and more await in Telling Tales, a concert of contemporary works for solo recorder presented by Imogen Morris. Whether depicting colourful characters, dwelling in a single salient moment, or simply recounting a story in its entirety, the pieces featured in the programme explore tales that have been told for generations.

The concert includes works by Isang Yun, Liza Lim, Markus Zahnhausen and many more, as well as the premiere of Euryale’s Lament on the Death of Medusa by New Zealand’s own Janet Jennings.

Icarus finding his wings (and his hubris!), the horns of Tennyson’s Elfland echoing through the valley, the mythical breath of the lion-headed goddess Sakhmet… these stories and more await in Telling Tales, a concert of contemporary works for solo recorder presented by Imogen Morris. Whether depicting colourful characters, dwelling in a single salient moment, or simply recounting a story in its entirety, the pieces featured in the programme explore tales that have been told for generations.

The concert includes works by Isang Yun, Liza Lim, Markus Zahnhausen and many more, as well as the premiere of Euryale’s Lament on the Death of Medusa by New Zealand’s own Janet Jennings.

Icarus finding his wings (and his hubris!), the horns of Tennyson’s Elfland echoing through the valley, the mythical breath of the lion-headed goddess Sakhmet… these stories and more await in Telling Tales, a concert of contemporary works for solo recorder presented by Imogen Morris. Whether depicting colourful characters, dwelling in a single salient moment, or simply recounting a story in its entirety, the pieces featured in the programme explore tales that have been told for generations.

The concert includes works by Isang Yun, Liza Lim, Markus Zahnhausen and many more, as well as the premiere of Euryale’s Lament on the Death of Medusa by New Zealand’s own Janet Jennings.

November 14, 2020 19:30 — November 14, 2020 21:00   ·   Maclaurin Chapel

New Zealand Symphony Orchestra | Spectacular

Concert

Gemma New | Conductor
Stephen De Pledge | Piano

Vaughan Williams | Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
Anthony Ritchie | Piano Concerto No. 3
Sibelius | Symphony No. 5


New life will spring forth in the much-loved Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, by Ralph Vaughan Williams. This work is paired with another great classic – Sibelius’ Symphony No. 5. With its glorious “swan-call” horn theme in the third movement, the Fifth Symphony remains one of the lushest and deeply moving symphonies of the 20th-century.


Gemma New | Conductor
Stephen De Pledge | Piano

Vaughan Williams | Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
Anthony Ritchie | Piano Concerto No. 3
Sibelius | Symphony No. 5


New life will spring forth in the much-loved Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, by Ralph Vaughan Williams. This work is paired with another great classic – Sibelius’ Symphony No. 5. With its glorious “swan-call” horn theme in the third movement, the Fifth Symphony remains one of the lushest and deeply moving symphonies of the 20th-century.


Gemma New | Conductor
Stephen De Pledge | Piano

Vaughan Williams | Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
Anthony Ritchie | Piano Concerto No. 3
Sibelius | Symphony No. 5


New life will spring forth in the much-loved Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, by Ralph Vaughan Williams. This work is paired with another great classic – Sibelius’ Symphony No. 5. With its glorious “swan-call” horn theme in the third movement, the Fifth Symphony remains one of the lushest and deeply moving symphonies of the 20th-century.


November 20, 2020 18:30   ·   Michael Fowler Centre, Wellington

NZTrio | Origins

Concert

Beethoven | Ghost Trio
Mark Anthony Turnage | A Fast Stomp
Sarah Ballard | Prema Lahari
Isang Yun | Piano Trio
Alexander von Zemlinsky | Piano Trio in D minor, Op. 3


Origins opens with Beethoven’s mighty Ghost trio to celebrate his birth a quarter of a millennium ago. Then we celebrate the rebirth of NZTrio, introducing this new line-up with a tour through our cultural and musical backgrounds. Works by Mark Anthony Turnage (UK) and Isang Yun (Korea) envelop a brand new work (and world premiere) by Sarah Ballard (NZ) deeply inspired by Indian culture and music. (How do these works represent us? Come along and find out!) To finish, our attention turns to the worrying global upsurges of separatism and hatred, so the last word comes from Austrian-American Alexander von Zemlinsky whose Jewish-Muslim upbringing inspires understanding and love.


Beethoven | Ghost Trio
Mark Anthony Turnage | A Fast Stomp
Sarah Ballard | Prema Lahari
Isang Yun | Piano Trio
Alexander von Zemlinsky | Piano Trio in D minor, Op. 3


Origins opens with Beethoven’s mighty Ghost trio to celebrate his birth a quarter of a millennium ago. Then we celebrate the rebirth of NZTrio, introducing this new line-up with a tour through our cultural and musical backgrounds. Works by Mark Anthony Turnage (UK) and Isang Yun (Korea) envelop a brand new work (and world premiere) by Sarah Ballard (NZ) deeply inspired by Indian culture and music. (How do these works represent us? Come along and find out!) To finish, our attention turns to the worrying global upsurges of separatism and hatred, so the last word comes from Austrian-American Alexander von Zemlinsky whose Jewish-Muslim upbringing inspires understanding and love.


Beethoven | Ghost Trio
Mark Anthony Turnage | A Fast Stomp
Sarah Ballard | Prema Lahari
Isang Yun | Piano Trio
Alexander von Zemlinsky | Piano Trio in D minor, Op. 3


Origins opens with Beethoven’s mighty Ghost trio to celebrate his birth a quarter of a millennium ago. Then we celebrate the rebirth of NZTrio, introducing this new line-up with a tour through our cultural and musical backgrounds. Works by Mark Anthony Turnage (UK) and Isang Yun (Korea) envelop a brand new work (and world premiere) by Sarah Ballard (NZ) deeply inspired by Indian culture and music. (How do these works represent us? Come along and find out!) To finish, our attention turns to the worrying global upsurges of separatism and hatred, so the last word comes from Austrian-American Alexander von Zemlinsky whose Jewish-Muslim upbringing inspires understanding and love.


November 21, 2020 17:00 — November 21, 2020 19:00   ·   Nathan Homestead

New Zealand Symphony Orchestra | Spectacular

Concert

Gemma New | Conductor
Stephen De Pledge | Piano

Vaughan Williams | Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
Anthony Ritchie | Piano Concerto No. 3
Sibelius | Symphony No. 5


New life will spring forth in the much-loved Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, by Ralph Vaughan Williams. This work is paired with another great classic – Sibelius’ Symphony No. 5. With its glorious “swan-call” horn theme in the third movement, the Fifth Symphony remains one of the lushest and deeply moving symphonies of the 20th-century.


Gemma New | Conductor
Stephen De Pledge | Piano

Vaughan Williams | Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
Anthony Ritchie | Piano Concerto No. 3
Sibelius | Symphony No. 5


New life will spring forth in the much-loved Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, by Ralph Vaughan Williams. This work is paired with another great classic – Sibelius’ Symphony No. 5. With its glorious “swan-call” horn theme in the third movement, the Fifth Symphony remains one of the lushest and deeply moving symphonies of the 20th-century.


Gemma New | Conductor
Stephen De Pledge | Piano

Vaughan Williams | Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
Anthony Ritchie | Piano Concerto No. 3
Sibelius | Symphony No. 5


New life will spring forth in the much-loved Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, by Ralph Vaughan Williams. This work is paired with another great classic – Sibelius’ Symphony No. 5. With its glorious “swan-call” horn theme in the third movement, the Fifth Symphony remains one of the lushest and deeply moving symphonies of the 20th-century.


November 21, 2020 19:30   ·   Auckland Town Hall, Auckland

Lewis Eady 140th Anniversary Celebrations with NZTrio

Performance

Lewis Eady is delighted to announce NZTrio as our Mystery Guest Ensemble for the final instalment of the Lewis Eady 140th Anniversary Concert Series. NZTrio has long been friends of Lewis Eady and performed in our showroom for our 130th Anniversary in 2010. Join us on Sunday 22 November and let's celebrate together the incredible milestone that is Lewis Eady's 140th Anniversary!

Programme includes works for piano trio by New Zealand composers, Gillian Whitehead and Claire Cowan.

Lewis Eady is delighted to announce NZTrio as our Mystery Guest Ensemble for the final instalment of the Lewis Eady 140th Anniversary Concert Series. NZTrio has long been friends of Lewis Eady and performed in our showroom for our 130th Anniversary in 2010. Join us on Sunday 22 November and let's celebrate together the incredible milestone that is Lewis Eady's 140th Anniversary!

Programme includes works for piano trio by New Zealand composers, Gillian Whitehead and Claire Cowan.

Lewis Eady is delighted to announce NZTrio as our Mystery Guest Ensemble for the final instalment of the Lewis Eady 140th Anniversary Concert Series. NZTrio has long been friends of Lewis Eady and performed in our showroom for our 130th Anniversary in 2010. Join us on Sunday 22 November and let's celebrate together the incredible milestone that is Lewis Eady's 140th Anniversary!

Programme includes works for piano trio by New Zealand composers, Gillian Whitehead and Claire Cowan.

November 22, 2020 19:30 — November 22, 2020 21:00   ·   Lewis Eady

SOUNZ Kaitito Kaipuoro Wānanga | Composer Workshop

Workshop

Our next wānanga is for composers of all genres who are interested in understanding and working with Taonga Puoro.

The day will include a discussion of the composition Ko te tātai whetū with co-composers Phil Brownlee and Ariana Tikao; a panel discussion with Taonga Puoro experts Tamihana Katene, Jerome Kavanagh, Ariana Tikao, Te Kahureremoa Taumata, Alistair Fraser and Ruby Solly; and a presentation of Oro Atua – a Māori Sound Healing Journey by Jerome Kavanagh.

The wānanga will take place on Saturday, 28 November from 9.30am to 5.00pm in the Upper Chamber at Toi Pōneke Arts Centre — Level 1, 61 Abel Smith Street, Wellington.

More details, including registration information, to follow...

Our next wānanga is for composers of all genres who are interested in understanding and working with Taonga Puoro.

The day will include a discussion of the composition Ko te tātai whetū with co-composers Phil Brownlee and Ariana Tikao; a panel discussion with Taonga Puoro experts Tamihana Katene, Jerome Kavanagh, Ariana Tikao, Te Kahureremoa Taumata, Alistair Fraser and Ruby Solly; and a presentation of Oro Atua – a Māori Sound Healing Journey by Jerome Kavanagh.

The wānanga will take place on Saturday, 28 November from 9.30am to 5.00pm in the Upper Chamber at Toi Pōneke Arts Centre — Level 1, 61 Abel Smith Street, Wellington.

More details, including registration information, to follow...

Our next wānanga is for composers of all genres who are interested in understanding and working with Taonga Puoro.

The day will include a discussion of the composition Ko te tātai whetū with co-composers Phil Brownlee and Ariana Tikao; a panel discussion with Taonga Puoro experts Tamihana Katene, Jerome Kavanagh, Ariana Tikao, Te Kahureremoa Taumata, Alistair Fraser and Ruby Solly; and a presentation of Oro Atua – a Māori Sound Healing Journey by Jerome Kavanagh.

The wānanga will take place on Saturday, 28 November from 9.30am to 5.00pm in the Upper Chamber at Toi Pōneke Arts Centre — Level 1, 61 Abel Smith Street, Wellington.

More details, including registration information, to follow...

November 28, 2020 09:30 — November 28, 2020 17:00   ·   Upper Chamber at Toi Pōneke Arts Centre, Wellington

Christchurch Symphony Orchestra | Tūmahana: Exchange

Concert

Juanita Hepi | artistic director
Danny Syme | co-director/head trainer
Hamish Oliver | composer


Tūmahana: Exchange is a bilingual (Te Reo Māori and English) performance that offers a glimpse into a past where generations of our tīpuna and ancestors have made their homes in and around the Ngāi Tahu takiwā of Te Waipounamu.

This all ages performance weaves theatre, aerial and visual arts, acrobatics, Toi Māori and Tāonga Pūoro with orchestral music in collaboration with Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke, Christchurch Circus Collective and CSO.


Juanita Hepi | artistic director
Danny Syme | co-director/head trainer
Hamish Oliver | composer


Tūmahana: Exchange is a bilingual (Te Reo Māori and English) performance that offers a glimpse into a past where generations of our tīpuna and ancestors have made their homes in and around the Ngāi Tahu takiwā of Te Waipounamu.

This all ages performance weaves theatre, aerial and visual arts, acrobatics, Toi Māori and Tāonga Pūoro with orchestral music in collaboration with Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke, Christchurch Circus Collective and CSO.


Juanita Hepi | artistic director
Danny Syme | co-director/head trainer
Hamish Oliver | composer


Tūmahana: Exchange is a bilingual (Te Reo Māori and English) performance that offers a glimpse into a past where generations of our tīpuna and ancestors have made their homes in and around the Ngāi Tahu takiwā of Te Waipounamu.

This all ages performance weaves theatre, aerial and visual arts, acrobatics, Toi Māori and Tāonga Pūoro with orchestral music in collaboration with Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke, Christchurch Circus Collective and CSO.


March 27, 2021 19:30   ·   Douglas Lilburn Auditorium, Christchurch
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