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In 2014, Anthony Ritchie's Fourth Symphony was premiered by the Christchurch Symphony Orchestra, the latest addition to a symphonic repertoire that spans two decades. Alongside the Resound film of this premiere, we present audio recordings of all Ritchie's earlier symphonies as they have recently become available for listening online through Resound.

Below are live recordings of all four of Ritchie's symphonies performed by Christchurch Symphony Orchestra, Dunedin Symphony Orchestra, Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra and the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra.

Also included is a Resound film of Ritchie's 2014 CANZ Conference presentation, The Large Canvas: the Symphony in Contemporary New Zealand Music.


  
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"My love of the symphonic form goes back to my early teens when I spent many hours listening to symphonies by Shostakovich, Sibelius, Stravinsky, Mahler, Vaughan Williams and others. I liked the way you could be drawn into a fantasy world of sound for such a long period of time: not just five or ten minutes but an half an hour or more. The length of these emotional and aural journeys transported me into a new realm of consciousness, and made me determined to compose symphonies myself. The two I wrote in my teens have never seen the light of day and gather dust in the Hocken Library!

However, when I finally had the opportunity to compose symphonies that would be played, I wanted to create my own long, emotional journeys, to create a world of musical symbolism and meaning of my own. I hope these four large ‘canvases’ of sound provide people with meaningful musical experiences, as well as provoking thoughts and emotions."


Anthony Ritchie, June 2016

  

Symphony No. 4 (2014)

Symphony No. 4 is written for soprano and orchestra. It is in one movement, divided into 14 sections, or ‘stations’, and uses poems by Bernadette Hall. It is dedicated to those in Christchurch who have suffered in the earthquakes. Listen to Anthony discuss the work here.

Full programme note available here.

Below is the Resound film of the work's premiere, featuring the Christchurch Symphony Orchestra and soprano Jenny Wollerman with conductor Tom Woods. The symphony has also been recorded on an Atoll Records CD, simply entitled Stations (2014) and this is available for purchase/hire.


  

  

Symphony No.3 (2010)

Symphony No. 3 is a portrayal of two sides of human personality, represented by the two movements of the work: Up and Down. The music depicts the constant struggle to find balance in one’s life, in terms of mood and relationships with other people. 



Full programme note available here.

Here is a recording of its premiere in October 2010 by the Dunedin Symphony Orchestra with conductor Simon Over.
 

  
Symphony No.3 has also been recorded by the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra with conductor Tecwyn Evans on the Atoll Records CD A Bugle Will Do, and this is available for purchase/hire. The score has been published by Promethean Editions in their University Series (2014).
  

  

Symphony No.2: The Widening Gyre (2000)

The title of Symphony No. 2 The Widening Gyre is a phrase from the poem The Second Coming from W. B. Yeats,  describing the political turmoil and change in the century leading to the new millennium. The three movements represent the past, present and future.

Full programme note available here.

Here is a recording of the work's premiere by the Auckland Philharmonic Orchestra with conductor James Sedares in 2000, from the International Arts Festival in Wellington.



  
Symphony No.2 has also been recorded by the Christchurch Symphony Orchestra with conductor Marc Taddei for Kiwi Pacific Records and is available for purchase / hire.
  

  

Symphony No.1: Boum (1993)

Symphony No. 1 Boum opens with a tam-tam stroke - the sound that the title of this symphony describes - and contemplates the mysteries of life and death. It was completed while Ritchie was Composer-in-residence with the Dunedin Symphony Orchestra in 1993, and first performed the following year, under the baton of Sir William Southgate. It has received numerous performances, including one in London in 2008.

Full programme note available here.

The recording below is by the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra with conductor Kenneth Young, dating from 1998



  
Symphony No.1 has also been recorded by the Christchurch Symphony Orchestra with conductor Marc Taddei for Kiwi Pacific Records and is available for purchase/hire.
  


Below is Anthony Ritchie's presentation at the 2014 CANZ Composers Conference: The Large Canvas: the Symphony in Contemporary New Zealand Music.


  

   
   
   
   
 

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